How We Decide Who Is 'Worthy of Welcome' : Code Switch Millions of Syrians have been displaced by ongoing civil war. In her new book, Refuge, Heba Gowayed follows Syrians who have resettled in the U.S., Canada and Germany. She argues that finding their footing in their new homes is less about individual choice and more about governmental systems.

How We Decide Who Is 'Worthy of Welcome'

How We Decide Who Is 'Worthy of Welcome'

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Author Heba Gowayed next to the cover of her book, Refuge: How the State Shapes Human Potential. Courtesy of Heba Gowayed hide caption

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Courtesy of Heba Gowayed

Author Heba Gowayed next to the cover of her book, Refuge: How the State Shapes Human Potential.

Courtesy of Heba Gowayed

The subject of refugees has been at the forefront of many people's minds since Russia invaded Ukraine earlier this year. But long before that invasion started, people from countries all over the world have been seeking refuge.

Since 2011, millions of Syrians have been displaced by the ongoing civil war. In her new book, Refuge, the author Heba Gowayed follows Syrians who have resettled in the U.S., Canada and Germany. She argues that whether they find their footing in their new homes is less about individual choice and more about how attitudes about race shape the kind of help available to people in need.