Study shows women take fewer risks and innovate more as top executives : The Indicator from Planet Money Companies with more top female execs are more likely to please customers, be socially responsible, and are more profitable. But we don't know why. Today we talk to Corinne Post, who thinks she's solved the mystery.

Why women make great bosses

Why women make great bosses

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1101064874/1101100128" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
Bill Pugliano/Getty Images
(Photo by Bill Pugliano/Getty Images)
Bill Pugliano/Getty Images

We know that when women step into executive roles it's associated with an increase in profitability. One study even found that increase could be as much as 15%. But what exactly are women doing at the C-Suite level that helps them achieve that kind of success?

Today, we talk to Villanova University professor of management, Corinne Post, about her new study on what changes in a company when women enter top level positions.

Music by Drop Electric. Find us: Twitter / Facebook / Newsletter.

Subscribe to our show on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, PocketCasts and NPR One.