What George Floyd's Murder – And Life – Have Changed, Two Years Later : Consider This from NPR This week marks two years since George Floyd's murder at the hands of a white police officer and the subsequent racial justice protests and calls for police reform that spread from Minneapolis across the country. President Joe Biden has signed a new executive order meant to change how police use force among other measures, which experts say is a small — but important — step in preventing more tragedies like Floyd's death.

But as Minnesota Public Radio's Matt Sepic reports, some Minneapolis residents say they're still waiting on the reform that leaders promised.

Also in this episode, Robert Samuels and Toluse Olorunnipa of The Washington Post discuss their new biography, His Name Is George Floyd, and how those who knew Floyd best want to make sure his legacy covers more than his murder.

In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what's going on in your community.

Email us at considerthis@npr.org.

Taking Stock of What George Floyd's Murder – And Life – Have Changed, Two Years Later

Taking Stock of What George Floyd's Murder – And Life – Have Changed, Two Years Later

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A view of the memorial on May 25, 2022 at the site where George Floyd was killed two years prior. Stephen Maturen/Getty Images hide caption

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Stephen Maturen/Getty Images

A view of the memorial on May 25, 2022 at the site where George Floyd was killed two years prior.

Stephen Maturen/Getty Images

This week marks two years since George Floyd's murder at the hands of a white police officer and the subsequent racial justice protests and calls for police reform that spread from Minneapolis across the country. President Joe Biden has signed a new executive order meant to change how police use force among other measures, which experts say is a small — but important — step in preventing more tragedies like Floyd's death.

But as Minnesota Public Radio's Matt Sepic reports, some Minneapolis residents say they're still waiting on the reform that leaders promised.

Also in this episode, Robert Samuels and Toluse Olorunnipa of The Washington Post discuss their new biography, His Name Is George Floyd, and how those who knew Floyd best want to make sure his legacy covers more than his murder.

In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what's going on in your community.

Email us at considerthis@npr.org.

This episode was produced by Mallory Yu and Jonaki Mehta. It was edited by Ashley Brown, Denice Rios, Martin Kaste, Ken Barcus and Patrick Jarenwattananon. Our executive producer is Cara Tallo.