School Colors Episode 5 : Code Switch Until recently, School District 28 in Queens, N.Y., was characterized by a white Northside, and a Black Southside. But today, the district, and Queens at large, has become what is considered to be one of the most diverse places on the planet. So how did District 28 go from being defined by this racial binary, to a place where people brag about how diverse it is?

School Colors Episode 5: 'The Melting Pot'

School Colors Episode 5: 'The Melting Pot'

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LA Johnson
School Colors Episode 5: "The Melting Pot"
LA Johnson

Until recently, School District 28 in Queens, N.Y., was characterized by a white Northside, and a Black Southside. For more than a hundred years, we've seen how conflicts around housing, schools and resources have played out mostly along this racial divide.

But today, the district, and Queens at large, has become what is considered to be one of the most diverse places on the planet. So how did District 28 go from being defined by this racial binary, to a place where people brag about how diverse it is?

In this episode, we're taking a deep dive into two immigrant communities that have settled in Queens: How they got here, what they brought with them, and what they make of their new home's old problems. These communities, Indo-Caribbeans and Bukharian Jews, challenge the way we think about race and ethnicity in this country and give us a better understanding of how immigration complicates the racial map of the district.