Overall college enrollments are declining, but not for 'elite' schools : The Indicator from Planet Money Ah, college... the classes, the parties, the debt. Is it still worth it? While most schools are seeing their enrollment decline, 'elite' schools are receiving a jump in applications.

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The lopsided market for higher ed

The lopsided market for higher ed

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Tennessee State University's Commencement Ceremony last month. The number of undergraduate students enrolled in college has declined by 9.4% during the pandemic, according to the National Student Clearinghouse Research Center. Jason Davis/Getty Images hide caption

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Jason Davis/Getty Images

Tennessee State University's Commencement Ceremony last month. The number of undergraduate students enrolled in college has declined by 9.4% during the pandemic, according to the National Student Clearinghouse Research Center.

Jason Davis/Getty Images

The number of undergraduate students enrolled in college has declined by 9.4% during the pandemic — the biggest drop in more than half a century, according to the National Student Clearinghouse Research Center. Meanwhile, some of the most selective schools in the country saw a record number of applicants. What could explain these divergent trends?

Today, we dive into the emerging Ivy-or-bust attitude towards college applications, and rethink the value of an "elite" education.

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