What is a monopsony and why does the government care so much? : The Indicator from Planet Money For decades, antitrust agencies focused on the harm to consumers. But lately, the federal government has started paying more attention to anticompetitive behavior when it comes to workers. Could this be a major turning point for antitrust enforcement?

For more on monopsony, check out the paper referenced in the show: Monopsony in Labor Markets: A Meta-Analysis.

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Are we entering a new dawn for antitrust enforcement?

Are we entering a new dawn for antitrust enforcement?

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Books are displayed on a shelf at Book Passage on November 02, 2021. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

Books are displayed on a shelf at Book Passage on November 02, 2021.

Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

Two titans in the book publishing world are joining forces, but there's a tiny roadblock in the way...ok a big one, the Department of Justice. The DOJ filed a lawsuit against the proposed merger between Penguin Random House and Simon & Schuster. The accusation? Monopsony.

On today's episode we explain what a monopsony is and why this might be a game changer for antitrust enforcement.

For more on monopsony, check out the paper referenced in the show: Monopsony in Labor Markets: A Meta-Analysis.

For more on the history of antitrust in the U.S. check out this primer from our friends at Planet Money.

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