The Limits of Science And Diplomacy In Space : Short Wave For decades, U.S. astronauts and Russian cosmonauts have lived side-by-side aboard the International Space Station. Host Aaron Scott talks with Science Correspondent Geoff Brumfiel about how a war on planet Earth is changing life in space and what those changes say about the limits of science as a tool for diplomacy.

For more of Geoff's reporting, check out "Russia's war in Ukraine is threatening an outpost of cooperation in space."

You can follow Aaron on Twitter @AaronScottNPR and Geoff @GBrumfiel. Email Short Wave at ShortWave@NPR.org.

War On Earth, Cooperation In Space

War On Earth, Cooperation In Space

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The Soyuz-2.1a rocket booster with cargo transportation spacecraft Progress МS-20 blasts off at the Russian leased Baikonur cosmodrome, Kazakhstan, Friday, June 3, 2022. AP hide caption

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The Soyuz-2.1a rocket booster with cargo transportation spacecraft Progress МS-20 blasts off at the Russian leased Baikonur cosmodrome, Kazakhstan, Friday, June 3, 2022.

AP

For decades, U.S. astronauts and Russian cosmonauts have lived side-by-side aboard the International Space Station. Host Aaron Scott talks with Science Correspondent Geoff Brumfiel about how a war on planet Earth is changing life in space and what those changes say about the limits of science as a tool for diplomacy.

For more of Geoff's reporting, check out "Russia's war in Ukraine is threatening an outpost of cooperation in space."

You can follow Aaron on Twitter @AaronScottNPR and Geoff @GBrumfiel. Email Short Wave at ShortWave@NPR.org.

This episode was edited by Will Stone and Gisele Grayson, produced by Thomas Lu, fact-checked by Rachel Carlson and Margaret Cirino. Special thanks to Alina Selyukh.