Good Things Come In Trees : Short Wave Do you ever feel better after walking down a street that's lined with lush, green trees? You're not alone! For decades, researchers have been studying the effects of nature on human health and the verdict is clear: time spent among the trees seems to make us less prone to disease, more resistant to infection and happier overall.

Aaron Scott talks with environmental psychologist Ming Kuo about why we need greenery and how you can bring more of it into your life.

Good Things Come In Trees

Good Things Come In Trees

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Beech trees seen from the forest floor. This image was taken in a forest named B√łkeskogen in Larvik city, Norway. Baac3nes/Getty Images hide caption

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Baac3nes/Getty Images

Beech trees seen from the forest floor. This image was taken in a forest named B√łkeskogen in Larvik city, Norway.

Baac3nes/Getty Images

Do you ever feel better after walking down a street that's lined with lush, green trees? You're not alone! For decades, researchers have been studying the effects of nature on human health and the verdict is clear: time spent among the trees seems to make us less prone to disease, more resistant to infection and happier overall.

Aaron Scott talks with environmental psychologist Ming Kuo about why we need greenery and how you can bring more of it into your life.

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