Child poverty worsens as COVID-era free lunch and child tax credit programs end. : The Indicator from Planet Money School's out, and so are pandemic-era relief measures for families with children. But when universal free lunches and expanded child tax credits roll to a halt, what are the consequences?

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Going backwards on child poverty

Going backwards on child poverty

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Masked cafeteria workers serve food. Jon Cherry/Getty Images hide caption

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Jon Cherry/Getty Images

Masked cafeteria workers serve food.

Jon Cherry/Getty Images

As the school year ends, so have some of the pandemic-era relief measures for families with children. For two years, U.S. public schools provided free meals for all students. But that's stopping at the end of June. The expanded child tax credit also expired in December of last year.

The ending of these temporary benefits leaves families vulnerable in a period of high inflation, and threatens to further erode progress made in reducing child poverty during the pandemic.

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