Mexican Entrepreneurs Rewrite Silicon Valley's "Fail Fast" Mantra : Rough Translation Many of us think we can't share our stories of failure until we've reached success. Some Mexico City entrepreneurs started a club to change that, and the world took notice.

Failing@Work: Epic Fails & Failure Epics

Listen.

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1106399772/1106717632" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Founder of LEAP Africa Ndidi Nwuneli attends Barnard College's Global Symposium in 2015. J. Countess/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
J. Countess/Getty Images

Founder of LEAP Africa Ndidi Nwuneli attends Barnard College's Global Symposium in 2015.

J. Countess/Getty Images

Silicon Valley gurus tell you to "Fail Fast." But what if you live in a place where the shame of failure is so strong, and the barriers to success so steep, that the "Failure-Is-Good" advice feels dangerous?

Today, we hear from workers around the world who are rewriting the failure mantra to fit the places they live and the business climates they enter.

Additional Context:


Send us an email at roughtranslation@npr.org.

Listen to Rough Translation wherever you get your podcasts, including NPR One, Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts, Pocket Casts, Spotify, and RSS.