Art as memory and why it must be saved; Alcohol-related deaths soar : Here & Now Galina and Yelena Lembersky fled the Soviet Union in the 1980s with hundreds of Galina's father's paintings. The paintings are now in Massachusetts, and so is the acting director of the Odesa Fine Arts Museum, Olesksandra Kovalchuk, who recently fled the war in Ukraine. Kovalchuk has been working from the U.S. to save the art left behind. The women reflect on the meaning of art as memory and the importance of saving it. And, alcohol use increased during the pandemic. One study suggests more Americans under 65 died from alcohol-related causes than COVID in 2020. Natalie Krebs of Side Effects Public Media and Iowa Public Radio reports.

Art as memory and why it must be saved; Alcohol-related deaths soar

Art as memory and why it must be saved; Alcohol-related deaths soar

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Galina and Yelena Lembersky fled the Soviet Union in the 1980s with hundreds of Galina's father's paintings. The paintings are now in Massachusetts, and so is the acting director of the Odesa Fine Arts Museum, Olesksandra Kovalchuk, who recently fled the war in Ukraine. Kovalchuk has been working from the U.S. to save the art left behind. The women reflect on the meaning of art as memory and the importance of saving it.

And, alcohol use increased during the pandemic. One study suggests more Americans under 65 died from alcohol-related causes than COVID in 2020. Natalie Krebs of Side Effects Public Media and Iowa Public Radio reports.

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