The Quest To Save The California Condor : Short Wave Historically, the California condor soared across the western skies of North America. But by the 1980s, the bird was on the edge of extinction — just 22 remained.

Thanks to decades of conservation work, the California condor population has rebounded to a couple hundred birds in Central California and Arizona. And this May, a large partnership led by the Yurok Tribe re-introduced the birds to Northern California.

Today, host Aaron Scott talks to Yurok biologist Tiana Williams-Claussen about the years-long quest to return the birds to their ancestral skies, and the importance of condor — who the Yurok call Prey-go-neesh — to the Yurok people and the natural world.

The Quest To Save The California Condor

The Quest To Save The California Condor

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On May 3, 2022, a partnership led by the Yurok Tribe released two California condors, called A2 and A3, into the wild as part of a decades-long conservation effort." Matt Mais/Yurok Tribe hide caption

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Matt Mais/Yurok Tribe

On May 3, 2022, a partnership led by the Yurok Tribe released two California condors, called A2 and A3, into the wild as part of a decades-long conservation effort."

Matt Mais/Yurok Tribe

Historically, the California condor soared across the western skies of North America. But by the 1980s, the bird was on the edge of extinction — just 22 remained.

Thanks to decades of conservation work, the California condor population has rebounded to a couple hundred birds in Central California and Arizona. And this May, a large partnership led by the Yurok Tribe re-introduced the birds to Northern California.

Today, host Aaron Scott talks to Yurok biologist Tiana Williams-Claussen about the years-long quest to return the birds to their ancestral skies, and the importance of condor — who the Yurok call Prey-go-neesh — to the Yurok people and the natural world.

Check out the Yurok Tribe's condor live stream.

This episode was produced by Rebecca Ramirez, edited by Gabriel Spitzer and fact-checked by Rachel Carlson.