The U.S. Supreme Court reverses Roe v. Wade. : Consider This from NPR On Friday, the U.S. Supreme Court officially reversed Roe v. Wade, declaring that the constitutional right to abortion no longer exists. For nearly 50 years, Americans have had a constitutional right to an abortion. We're about to find out what the country looks like without one. The court's ruling doesn't mean a nationwide ban– it allows states to do what they want.

NPR's Nina Totenberg walks us through the ruling, and NPR's Sarah McCammon discusses the states where "trigger bans," or laws passed in anticipation of the Supreme Court's action, are already in place.

In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what's going on in your community.

Email us at considerthis@npr.org.

Roe v. Wade Is Overturned

Roe v. Wade Is Overturned

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Abortion rights demonstrator Elizabeth White leads a chant in response to the Dobbs v Jackson Women's Health Organization ruling in front of the U.S. Supreme Court on June 24, 2022 in Washington, DC. The Court's decision in Dobbs v Jackson Women's Health overturns the landmark 50-year-old Roe v Wade case and erases a federal right to an abortion. Brandon Bell/Getty Images hide caption

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Brandon Bell/Getty Images

Abortion rights demonstrator Elizabeth White leads a chant in response to the Dobbs v Jackson Women's Health Organization ruling in front of the U.S. Supreme Court on June 24, 2022 in Washington, DC. The Court's decision in Dobbs v Jackson Women's Health overturns the landmark 50-year-old Roe v Wade case and erases a federal right to an abortion.

Brandon Bell/Getty Images

On Friday, the U.S. Supreme Court officially reversed Roe v. Wade, declaring that the constitutional right to abortion no longer exists. For nearly 50 years, Americans have had a constitutional right to an abortion. We're about to find out what the country looks like without one. The court's ruling doesn't mean a nationwide ban– it allows states to do what they want.

NPR's Nina Totenberg walks us through the ruling, and NPR's Sarah McCammon discusses the states where "trigger bans," or laws passed in anticipation of the Supreme Court's action, are already in place.

In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what's going on in your community.

Email us at considerthis@npr.org.

This episode was produced by Connor Donevan, Lauren Hodges, Mia Venkat and Brianna Scott. It was edited by Matt Ozug. Our executive producer is Sami Yenigun.