The promise and peril of cryptocurrencies like Bitcoin for Black investors. : The Indicator from Planet Money Black consumers are more likely to own crypto than white consumers and crypto enthusiasts laud the crypto world as a driver for racial equity. In today's show we explore that premise. If you're interested in learning more, listen to the episode and check out Terri Bradford's article on Black crypto ownership.

The promise and peril of crypto for Black investors

The promise and peril of crypto for Black investors

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A gold plated souvenir cryptocurrency Tether (USDT) coin arranged beside a screen displaying US dollar notes. JUSTIN TALLIS/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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JUSTIN TALLIS/AFP via Getty Images

A gold plated souvenir cryptocurrency Tether (USDT) coin arranged beside a screen displaying US dollar notes.

JUSTIN TALLIS/AFP via Getty Images

Cryptocurrencies have plunged about 56% in value in the past three months. And while many people have lost money, various surveys (here, here, and here) suggest that Black investors in particular may be feeling the fall. So what's drawn Black investors to crypto, and what does the current crypto crash mean for the idea some crypto-bulls have promoted—that these risky digital assets can be a driver for racial equity and Black wealth?

Today on the show: We hear from entrepreneur Samson Williams, law professor Tonya Evans, and Terri Bradford, who researched Black crypto ownership for the Federal Reserve Bank of Kansas City.

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