Micro Wave: Scientists Discover GINORMOUS Bacteria : Short Wave The Caribbean is home to gorgeous beaches, mangroves and ... the biggest bacteria known to humankind. Find out exactly how big from science correspondent Nell Greenfieldboyce in this Micro Wave. Then, stay for the listener mail, where we answer YOUR questions — all hosted by our new senior editor, Gabriel Spitzer!

Do you have a question for Short Wave? Email us a voice memo at shortwave@npr.org.

Micro Wave: Scientists Discover GINORMOUS Bacteria

Micro Wave: Scientists Discover GINORMOUS Bacteria

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The new bacteria, named Thiomargarita magnifica, were discovered on sunken leaves in a Caribbean mangrove swamp. The bacteria, shown here next to a dime, are close to the size of human eyelashes. Tomas Tyml/Tomas Tyml/The Regents of the University of California, LBNL hide caption

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Tomas Tyml/Tomas Tyml/The Regents of the University of California, LBNL

The new bacteria, named Thiomargarita magnifica, were discovered on sunken leaves in a Caribbean mangrove swamp. The bacteria, shown here next to a dime, are close to the size of human eyelashes.

Tomas Tyml/Tomas Tyml/The Regents of the University of California, LBNL

The Caribbean is home to gorgeous beaches, mangroves and ... the biggest bacteria known to humankind. Find out exactly how big from science correspondent Nell Greenfieldboyce in this "Micro Wave." Then, stay for the listener mail, where we answer YOUR questions — all hosted by our new senior editor, Gabriel Spitzer!

Do you have a question for Short Wave? Email us a voice memo at shortwave@npr.org.

This episode was produced by Berly McCoy, edited by Rebecca Ramirez and fact-checked by Rachel Carlson. The audio engineer was Natasha Branch.

Correction July 1, 2022

In a previous version of this episode, we referred to the existence of "single-celled animals." Animals are by definition multicellular — we should have instead said "organism." The audio has been updated to reflect the correct "organism."