Dolphin excrement could be the key to saving the world's coral reefs A new study shows spinner dolphins absorb a lot of nitrogen during their daily routines. And when they swim to the shallows to do their business, they provide vital nutrients to the corals.

Dolphin excrement could be the key to saving the world's coral reefs

Dolphin excrement could be the key to saving the world's coral reefs

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1109965559/1109965560" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A new study shows spinner dolphins absorb a lot of nitrogen during their daily routines. And when they swim to the shallows to do their business, they provide vital nutrients to the corals.

LEILA FADEL, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Leila Fadel. Dolphin poop - or excrement - could help save endangered coral reefs. A new study from the Zoological Society of London found that highly acrobatic spinner dolphins absorb a lot of nitrogen during their daily routines. And when they swim to the shallows to do their business, they provide vital nutrients to the corals, building reef productivity and resilience just by answering the call of nature in their favorite lagoon. It's MORNING EDITION.

Copyright © 2022 NPR. All rights reserved. Visit our website terms of use and permissions pages at www.npr.org for further information.

NPR transcripts are created on a rush deadline by an NPR contractor. This text may not be in its final form and may be updated or revised in the future. Accuracy and availability may vary. The authoritative record of NPR’s programming is the audio record.