What Should Parents Know About COVID Shots For Young Kids? : Consider This from NPR COVID vaccines are available to children as young as six months old. Still, plenty of parents and caretakers have questions before they get their children the jab. NPR Health Correspondent Rob Stein and Dr. Nia Heard-Garris, a pediatrician at the Ann and Robert H. Lurie Children's Hospital of Chicago, answer some of those questions from listeners.

In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what's going on in your community.

Email us at considerthis@npr.org.

Your Vaccine Questions Answered

Your Vaccine Questions Answered

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A child receives the Pfizer BioNTech vaccine at the Fairfax County Government Center in Annandale, Va., last November. Vaccines are now available for children as young as 6 months old. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

A child receives the Pfizer BioNTech vaccine at the Fairfax County Government Center in Annandale, Va., last November. Vaccines are now available for children as young as 6 months old.

Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

COVID vaccines are available to children as young as six months old. Still, plenty of parents and caretakers have questions before they get their children the jab. NPR Health Correspondent Rob Stein and Dr. Nia Heard-Garris, a pediatrician at the Ann and Robert H. Lurie Children's Hospital of Chicago, answer some of those questions from listeners.

In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what's going on in your community.

Email us at considerthis@npr.org.

This episode was produced by Gabe O'Connor and Connor Donevan. It was edited by Mallory Yu, Scott Hensley, and Brent Baughman. Our executive producer is Sami Yenigun.