Copyright small claims court : The Indicator from Planet Money A new alternative to federal court for copyright holders may provide an inexpensive route towards justice for small businesses. But is cheaper, better? How well will it work?

Copyright small claims court

Copyright small claims court

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A cosplayer dressed as tinkerbell. Dia Dipasupil/Getty Images for ReedPOP hide caption

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Dia Dipasupil/Getty Images for ReedPOP

A cosplayer dressed as tinkerbell.

Dia Dipasupil/Getty Images for ReedPOP

For Angela Jarman, justice may finally be served. The artist makes fairy wings and says files of her clip art were used without a credit.

Up until a month ago, Jarman would likely have been forced to take her case to federal court which can cost hundreds of thousands. But now she's trying something new - the Copyright Claims Board at the Library of Congress. She doesn't need a lawyer and it's far cheaper. How well will it work?

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