Making Space Travel Accessible For People With Disabilities : Short Wave This week NASA released some of the sharpest images of space ever from the James Webb Space Telescope. The telescope's camera gives us a glimpse into distant galaxies and a picture of the makings of our universe.

Tomorrow, we'll nerd out about those photos.

But today, we're revisiting the idea of space travel. This encore episode, science correspondent Geoff Brumfiel talks to New York Times Disability Reporting Fellow Amanda Morris about one organization working to ensure disabled people have the chance to go to space.

You can always reach the show by emailing shortwave@npr.org.

Making Space Travel Accessible For People With Disabilities

Making Space Travel Accessible For People With Disabilities

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Stocktrek/Getty Images
Space shuttle orbiting Earth
Stocktrek/Getty Images

This week NASA released some of the sharpest images of space ever from the James Webb Space Telescope. The telescope's camera gives us a glimpse into distant galaxies and a picture of the makings of our universe.

Tomorrow, we'll nerd out about those photos.

But today, we're revisiting the idea of space travel. This encore episode, science correspondent Geoff Brumfiel talks to New York Times Disability Reporting Fellow Amanda Morris about one organization working to ensure disabled people have the chance to go to space.

You can always reach the show by emailing shortwave@npr.org.

This episode was produced by Thomas Lu, edited by Gisele Grayson, and fact-checked by Margaret Cirino. The audio engineer for this episode was Leo Del Aguila.