Two indigenous authors on the miracle of Indigenous survival against all odds : NPR's Book of the Day Today, two books from indigenous authors who make a similar, wry argument: it's a miracle there are any Indigenous people in the Americas alive at all. First, Stephen Graham Jones talks about his horror novel The Only Good Indians, a reworking of an old, hostile phrase attributed to Theodore Roosevelt; plus the literary reasons why he chose to make it a horror story. Then, author Lisa Bird-Wilson talks about how her personal experience influenced her new book, Probably Ruby, a novel that follows the legacy of forced Indigenous adoption and residential schools in Canada.

Two Indigenous authors on the legacy of a shared, painful history

Two Indigenous authors on the legacy of a shared, painful history

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Gallery/Saga Press and Hogarth

Gallery/Saga Press and Hogarth

Gallery/Saga Press and Hogarth

Today, two books from indigenous authors who make a similar, wry argument: it's a miracle there are any Indigenous people in the Americas alive at all. First, Stephen Graham Jones talks about his horror novel The Only Good Indians, a reworking of an old, hostile phrase attributed to Theodore Roosevelt; plus the literary reasons why he chose to make it a horror story. Then, author Lisa Bird-Wilson talks about how her personal experience influenced her new book, Probably Ruby, a novel that follows the legacy of forced Indigenous adoption and residential schools in Canada.