Strong currencies amid high inflation may lead to a reverse currency war. : The Indicator from Planet Money As countries crank up their interest rates to fight inflation, the whispers of a reverse currency war are getting louder. But is this cause for concern or just political posturing?

The rumbles of a reverse currency war

The rumbles of a reverse currency war

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A man passes by the foreign currencies board of a bureau de change in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, October 1, 2010. VANDERLEI ALMEIDA/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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VANDERLEI ALMEIDA/AFP via Getty Images

A man passes by the foreign currencies board of a bureau de change in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, October 1, 2010.

VANDERLEI ALMEIDA/AFP via Getty Images

With inflation at an all-time high, countries are scrambling to pull the brakes and cool down their overheating economies. But with everyone doing the same, tensions could flare.

Introducing: a reverse currency war. A global competition where countries are all trying to strengthen their currencies.

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