Black students are more likely to default on loans : The Indicator from Planet Money Before, after, and during college, the cards are still stacked against Black students. Today, we look at how that reality translates into Black borrowers being more likely to default on their student loans.

Here's why Black students are defaulting

Here's why Black students are defaulting?

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Students attend their graduation ceremony at South Carolina State University. MANDEL NGAN/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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MANDEL NGAN/AFP via Getty Images

Students attend their graduation ceremony at South Carolina State University.

MANDEL NGAN/AFP via Getty Images

One course after another, one year after another. Suddenly, you're left with thousands of dollars in student loans with no guarantee of graduation. For many Black students like Aniya Morina, this is a familiar tale.

Today on The Indicator, we explore why Black borrowers are three times more likely to default on their student loans than white borrowers. From the intergenerational wealth gap to discrimination in the labor market, to the type of majors and colleges they choose, find out how Black students are often disadvantaged even before college starts.

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