How student athlete endorsements are changing the game : The Indicator from Planet Money For some student athletes, taco discounts and even Lamborghini partnerships are becoming a reality. That's because last summer , the NCAA changed a decades-old precedence that banned college sports stars from pursuing lucrative brand deals. How has that decision changed the game a year on?

The monetization of college sports

The monetization of college sports

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The NCAA logo and a game ball as the South Carolina Gamecocks warm-up. Andy Lyons/Getty Images hide caption

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Andy Lyons/Getty Images

The NCAA logo and a game ball as the South Carolina Gamecocks warm-up.

Andy Lyons/Getty Images

For student athletes, long gone are the days of shady, under-the-cover deals. After the NCAA changed its stance on NIL – that's name, image, and likeness for short – college sports stars are now able to pursue brand deals with different sponsors from the local taco shop to Lamborghini.

On today's show, delve into the long (and ongoing) battle for financial compensation in the world of college athletics and what repercussions we are seeing in the game a year on.

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