Extreme Heatwaves Are Affecting Lives And Climate Policy from the UK to China : Consider This from NPR Record high temperatures have wreaked havoc around the world this week. In Southern England, railway tracks bent from the heat. In China, the roof tiles on a museum melted. In Texas, heat and a dry spell have caused nearly 200 water main breaks over the past month.

And extreme heat puts lives at risk, too. It's more deadly than tornadoes, hurricanes, and all other weather events combined.

Extreme temperatures, and the attendant misery, are connected to global warming, which is driven by human activity and accelerating.

Reporters from around the globe talk about what they're seeing and how governments are responding. NPR's Rebecca Hersher, who reports on climate science and policy from the US, NPR's John Ruwitch in Shanghai and Willem Marx in London.

This episode also features reporting from NPR's Franco Ordoñez.

In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what's going on in your community.

Email us at considerthis@npr.org.

Climate Change And Record Breaking Heat Around The World

Climate Change And Record Breaking Heat Around The World

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Two women in London dip their heads into the Trafalgar Square fountain on July 19, 2022 as the UK experiences an extreme heat wave. Dan Kitwood/Getty Images hide caption

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Dan Kitwood/Getty Images

Two women in London dip their heads into the Trafalgar Square fountain on July 19, 2022 as the UK experiences an extreme heat wave.

Dan Kitwood/Getty Images

Record high temperatures have wreaked havoc around the world this week. In Southern England, railway tracks bent from the heat. In China, the roof tiles on a museum melted. In Texas, heat and a dry spell have caused nearly 200 water main breaks over the past month.

And extreme heat puts lives at risk, too. It's more deadly than tornadoes, hurricanes, and all other weather events combined.

Extreme temperatures, and the attendant misery, are connected to global warming, which is driven by human activity and accelerating.

Reporters from around the globe talk about what they're seeing and how governments are responding. NPR's Rebecca Hersher, who reports on climate science and policy from the US, NPR's John Ruwitch in Shanghai and Willem Marx in London.

This episode also features reporting from NPR's Franco Ordoñez.

In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what's going on in your community.

Email us at considerthis@npr.org.

This episode was produced by Mia Venkat. It was edited by Bridget Kelley, Larry Kaplow and Neela Banerjee. Our executive producer is Sami Yenigun.