Pope Francis Apologizes To Canadas Indigenous Peoples : Consider This from NPR This week, Pope Francis has been in Canada, on what he calls a "Pilgrimage of Penance". He's been going around the country to apologize for the Catholic Church's role in Canada's residential school system.

These schools – funded by the Canadian government and administered by the Catholic Church – were aimed at erasing the culture and language of indigenous people.

The apology from Pope Francis this week comes after years of allegations detailing abuse and neglect at these residential boarding schools. Canada's Truth and Reconciliation Commission was established in 2008 to document what happened at these schools – and the lasting trauma that has followed.

Stephanie Scott is a member of the Anishinaabe from Roseau River First Nation. She's executive director of the National Center for Truth and Reconciliation – and has been part of a years-long effort to gather the testimony of survivors. She shares with us the mixed feelings about the Pope's apology, and the work that still has to be done towards reconciliation.

In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what's going on in your community.

Email us at considerthis@npr.org.

In Canada, The Pope Delivers An Apology To Indigenous Peoples

In Canada, The Pope Delivers An Apology To Indigenous Peoples

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Pope Francis comes to Canada to apologize to Indigenous peoples for the Church's role in the atrocities committed in the residential school system. Lars Hagberg/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Lars Hagberg/AFP via Getty Images

Pope Francis comes to Canada to apologize to Indigenous peoples for the Church's role in the atrocities committed in the residential school system.

Lars Hagberg/AFP via Getty Images

This week, Pope Francis has been in Canada, on what he calls a "Pilgrimage of Penance". He's been going around the country to apologize for the Catholic Church's role in Canada's residential school system.

These schools – funded by the Canadian government and administered by the Catholic Church – were aimed at erasing the culture and language of indigenous people.

The apology from Pope Francis this week comes after years of allegations detailing abuse and neglect at these residential boarding schools. Canada's Truth and Reconciliation Commission was established in 2008 to document what happened at these schools – and the lasting trauma that has followed.

Stephanie Scott is a member of the Anishinaabe from Roseau River First Nation. She's executive director of the National Center for Truth and Reconciliation – and has been part of a years-long effort to gather the testimony of survivors. She shares with us the mixed feelings about the Pope's apology, and the work that still has to be done towards reconciliation.

In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what's going on in your community.

Email us at considerthis@npr.org.

This episode was produced by Mia Venkat and Taylor Hutchinson. It was edited by Bridget Kelley, Mallory Yu and Tara Neill. Additional reporting in this episode from Emma Jacobs. Our executive producer is Sami Yenigun.