Lost In Translation : Code Switch Today on the show, we're bringing you the stories of two families grappling with how best to communicate across linguistic differences. In the first story, a young man sorts through how to talk to his parents about gender in Chinese, where the words for "he" and "she" sound exactly the same. Then, we follow a family who was advised to stop speaking their heritage language, Japanese, based on some outdated and incomplete research.

Lost In Translation

Lost In Translation

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Left, Emmett Chen-Ran and his mother, Yanfei Ran. Right, siblings Max and Isabella Bloom play together. Courtesy of the Chen-Ran and Bloom families hide caption

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Courtesy of the Chen-Ran and Bloom families

Left, Emmett Chen-Ran and his mother, Yanfei Ran. Right, siblings Max and Isabella Bloom play together.

Courtesy of the Chen-Ran and Bloom families

Today on the show, we're bringing you the stories of two families grappling with how to communicate across languages. In the first story, a young man sorts through how to talk to his parents about gender in Chinese, where the words for "he" and "she" sound exactly the same. Then, we follow a family who was advised to stop speaking their heritage language, Japanese, based on some unsound advice and outdated research.

These stories were reported by Elena Neale-Sacks and Isabella Bloom. Both are journalists and recent graduates of UC Berkeley's Graduate School of Journalism.

For more information on the linguistics of gender and pronouns in Chinese, check out the Gender in Language Project.

The Code Switch version of this piece was edited by Leah Donnella and produced by Kumari Devarajan and Leah Donnella