Climate Change Is Tough On Personal Finances : The Indicator from Planet Money More than three-quarters of adults in the United States say they've experienced extreme weather in the last five years, according to a nationwide survey conducted by NPR, the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, and the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health.

And events like floods, wildfires and hurricanes are emptying bank accounts — especially when insurance doesn't cover the damage. Today on The Indicator, we bring you an episode of Short Wave, NPR's daily science podcast.

Climate Change Is Tough On Personal Finances

Climate Change Is Tough On Personal Finances

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Heat advisories have been issued throughout central Texas this week. Brandon Bell/Getty Images hide caption

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Brandon Bell/Getty Images

Heat advisories have been issued throughout central Texas this week.

Brandon Bell/Getty Images

More than three-quarters of adults in the United States say they've experienced extreme weather in the last five years, according to a nationwide survey conducted by NPR, the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, and the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health.

And events like floods, wildfires and hurricanes are emptying bank accounts--especially when insurance doesn't cover the damage. Today on The Indicator, we bring you an episode of Short Wave, NPR's daily science podcast.

Short Wave co-host Aaron Scott talks to science reporter Rebecca Hersher about the new survey, and the hidden ways climate change could impact your finances.

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