The Earth is spinning faster than ever and it's making our days shorter The shortest day ever recorded was June 29, and it was shorter than a typical 24 hours by 1.59 milliseconds. Some scientists say its climate change, others say maybe it's because of earthquakes.

The Earth is spinning faster than ever and it's making our days shorter

The Earth is spinning faster than ever and it's making our days shorter

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The shortest day ever recorded was June 29, and it was shorter than a typical 24 hours by 1.59 milliseconds. Some scientists say its climate change, others say maybe it's because of earthquakes.

A MARTINEZ, HOST:

Good morning. I'm A Martinez. Ever feel like there's just not enough time the day? Consider this - the Earth is spinning faster than ever, and it's making our days shorter. The shortest day ever recorded was June 29. It was shorter than a typical 24 hours by 1.59 milliseconds. Some scientists say it's climate change; others say maybe earthquakes; still others suggest movement inside the Earth's core. Whatever the reason, even if it's just 1 1/2 milliseconds, I can't afford to give up the sleep. It's MORNING EDITION.

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