Kentucky chef delivers food, hope to flood victims; Looking for rare wild ginseng : Here & Now Anytime In the aftermath of widespread Eastern Kentucky flooding, one Kentucky chef is cooking up food for residents affected and traversing nearly-impassible routes to get it to them. Joe Arvin joins us to talk about his efforts. And, ginseng has been cultivated for thousands of years for its medicinal benefits, but it's now endangered. Researchers in Tennessee have found a patch, but they won't share its location. Steve Haruch of WPLN joined researchers in their scouting and reports.

Kentucky chef delivers food, hope to flood victims; Looking for rare wild ginseng

Kentucky chef delivers food, hope to flood victims; Looking for rare wild ginseng

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In the aftermath of widespread Eastern Kentucky flooding, one Kentucky chef is cooking up food for residents affected and traversing nearly-impassible routes to get it to them. Joe Arvin joins us to talk about his efforts.

And, ginseng has been cultivated for thousands of years for its medicinal benefits, but it's now endangered. Researchers in Tennessee have found a patch, but they won't share its location. Steve Haruch of WPLN joined researchers in their scouting and reports.

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