An Investigation Reveals How Family Separation Came To Be : Consider This from NPR In 2018, more than 5,500 children of immigrants were separated from their parents at the border.

The Trump administration's "Zero Tolerance" policy, better known as family separation, was short-lived, ending in June of 2018 after facing condemnation from the public and members of Congress.

For some families, it took years to reunite, and hundreds of families still have not been brought back together.

Caitlin Dickerson's latest cover story for The Atlantic, titled, "We Need To Take Away Children: The Secret History Of The U.S. Government's Family Separation Policy", is an exhaustive investigation into how the policy came about.

In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what's going on in your community.

Email us at considerthis@npr.org.

How The Family Separation Policy Came To Be

How The Family Separation Policy Came To Be

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David Xol-Cholom, of Guatemala, hugs his son Byron Xol-Cholom at Los Angeles International Airport as they reunite after being separated about one and half years earlier during the Trump administration's wide-scale separation of immigrant families in Los Angeles on Jan. 22, 2020. Ringo H.W. Chiu/AP hide caption

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Ringo H.W. Chiu/AP

David Xol-Cholom, of Guatemala, hugs his son Byron Xol-Cholom at Los Angeles International Airport as they reunite after being separated about one and half years earlier during the Trump administration's wide-scale separation of immigrant families in Los Angeles on Jan. 22, 2020.

Ringo H.W. Chiu/AP

In 2018, more than 5,500 children of immigrants were separated from their parents at the border.

The Trump administration's "Zero Tolerance" policy, better known as family separation, was short-lived, ending in June of 2018 after facing condemnation from the public and members of Congress.

For some families, it took years to reunite, and hundreds of families still have not been brought back together.

Caitlin Dickerson's latest cover story for The Atlantic, titled, "We Need To Take Away Children: The Secret History Of The U.S. Government's Family Separation Policy", is an exhaustive investigation into how the policy came about.

In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what's going on in your community.

Email us at considerthis@npr.org.

This episode was produced by Brianna Scott and Lauren Hodges. It was edited by Bridget Kelley and Christopher Intagliata. Our executive producer is Sami Yenigun.