The Concerns Looming Over The 988 Mental Health Hotline : 1A Dialing for help in a mental health crisis just got shorter. Now, Americans can dial 988 for assistance in an emergency instead of a previous 10-digit number directing them to the national suicide prevention hotline.

However, some concerns emerged during the service's rollout. There are questions about how local call centers will continue to fund these efforts long-term after the initial funding runs dry.

And questions about police intervention have spurred fears, especially in the queer and Black communities.

We talk about the new hotline and how leaders and call centers are addressing these concerns.

Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find us on Twitter @1A.

1A

The Concerns Looming Over The 988 Mental Health Hotline

The Concerns Looming Over The 988 Mental Health Hotline

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1117781906/1117782750" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

George Frey/Getty Images George Frey/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
George Frey/Getty Images

George Frey/Getty Images

George Frey/Getty Images

Dialing for help in a mental health crisis just got shorter. Now, Americans can dial 988 for assistance in an emergency instead of a previous 10-digit number directing them to the national suicide prevention hotline.

The Biden administration is giving local call centers $432 million to beef up support via additional staffing and Spanish-speaking agents.

Some concerns have emerged during the service's rollout. There are questions about how centers will continue to fund these efforts long-term after the initial funding runs dry. Questions about police intervention have mounted, especially in the queer and Black communities.

How are leaders and call centers addressing these concerns?

Kaiser Health News' Aneri Pattani, Secretary of Health and Human Services Xavier Becerra, University of North Carolina's Sonyia Richardson, and Community Crisis Services Inc.'s Erica Turner.

Like what you hear? Find more of our programs online.