Liz Cheney lost her primary. Now what? : Consider This from NPR A key primary this week in Wyoming re-affirmed Donald Trump's hold on the Republican party.

As expected, Republican Representative Liz Cheney lost her race in a landslide, defeated by attorney Harriet Hageman, a Trump-endorsed political newcomer.

Cheney, daughter of former Vice President Dick Cheney, came to office five years ago as a Republican darling. But everything shifted when she voted to impeach Trump after the January 6th insurrection. She then took center stage in the January 6th hearings, speaking out against Republicans that continued to defend Trump's stolen election lie.

With Cheney's time in Congress coming to an end, Political journalist Jodi Edna has been thinking about what Cheney might do next — and what it means for the future of the GOP.

In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what's going on in your community.

Email us at considerthis@npr.org.

Where Does Liz Cheney Go From Here?

Where Does Liz Cheney Go From Here?

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US Representative Liz Cheney (R-WY) speaks to supporters at an election night event during the Wyoming primary election at Mead Ranch in Jackson, Wyoming on August 16, 2022. PATRICK T. FALLON/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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PATRICK T. FALLON/AFP via Getty Images

US Representative Liz Cheney (R-WY) speaks to supporters at an election night event during the Wyoming primary election at Mead Ranch in Jackson, Wyoming on August 16, 2022.

PATRICK T. FALLON/AFP via Getty Images

A key primary this week in Wyoming re-affirmed Donald Trump's hold on the Republican party.

As expected, Republican Representative Liz Cheney lost her race in a landslide, defeated by attorney Harriet Hageman, a Trump-endorsed political newcomer.

Cheney, daughter of former Vice President Dick Cheney, came to office five years ago as a Republican darling. But everything shifted when she voted to impeach Trump after the January 6th insurrection. She then took center stage in the January 6th hearings, speaking out against Republicans that continued to defend Trump's stolen election lie.

With Cheney's time in Congress coming to an end, Political journalist Jodi Edna has been thinking about what Cheney might do next — and what it means for the future of the GOP.

In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what's going on in your community.

Email us at considerthis@npr.org.

This episode was produced by Kat Lonsdorf and Linah Mohammad. It was edited by Sami Yenigun, Ashley Brown, Arnie Seipel and Brianna Scott. Our executive producer is Sami Yenigun.