How should eBooks be priced? Librarians and publishers weigh in : The Indicator from Planet Money Long gone are the days of hauling sixty books home from the local library. With eBooks, the worlds of Fahrenheit 451 to Harry Potter are at your fingertips with just a tap. But what's the price behind the click?

The surprising economics of digital lending

The surprising economics of digital lending

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DANIEL ROLAND/AFP via Getty Images
A kindle e-book reader is pictured at the Book Fair in Frankfurt, Germany, October 15, 2015. AFP PHOTO / DANIEL ROLAND (Photo by DANIEL ROLAND / AFP) (Photo by DANIEL ROLAND/AFP via Getty Images)
DANIEL ROLAND/AFP via Getty Images

eBooks are books but not... you know, print books. While digital materials have expanded access for literary enthusiasts everywhere, libraries are paying the price.

That's because libraries don't buy eBooks for their collections. They license them. So then the question begs, what's the goldilocks price for digital lending? Well, publishers and librarians duke it out on today's episode.

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