Sweating Buckets... of SCIENCE! : Short Wave Sweating can be unpleasant, but consider the alternatives: You could roll around in mud. You could spend all day panting. You could have someone whip you up a blood popsicle. Sweating turns out to be pretty essential for human existence, AND arguably less gross than the ways other animals keep from overheating.

On today's episode, a small army of NPR science reporters joins host Emily Kwong to talk about how humans developed the unique ability to perspire, how sweat works in space and the neat things other animals do to beat the heat.

How have you (and the animals in your life) stayed cool this summer? Let us know at shortwave@npr.org.

Sweating Buckets... of SCIENCE!

Sweating Buckets... of SCIENCE!

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Sweating can be unpleasant, but consider the alternatives: You could roll around in mud. You could spend all day panting. You could have someone whip you up a blood popsicle. Sweating turns out to be pretty essential for human existence, AND arguably less gross than the ways other animals keep from overheating.

On today's episode, a small army of NPR science reporters joins host Emily Kwong to talk about how humans developed the unique ability to perspire, how sweat works in space and the neat things other animals do to beat the heat.

How have you (and the animals in your life) stayed cool this summer? Let us know at shortwave@npr.org.