NASA says there is a misconception that there is no sound in space NASA released a sound from the black hole at the center of the Perseus galaxy cluster. What you'll hear is pressure waves emitted from the black hole causing ripples in the star cluster's hot gas.

NASA says there is a misconception that there is no sound in space

NASA says there is a misconception that there is no sound in space

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NASA released a sound from the black hole at the center of the Perseus galaxy cluster. What you'll hear is pressure waves emitted from the black hole causing ripples in the star cluster's hot gas.

A MARTINEZ, HOST:

Good morning. I'm A Martinez. There's no sound in space, right?

(SOUNDBITE OF HUMMING)

MARTINEZ: That's sound released by NASA from the black hole at the center of the Perseus galaxy cluster. What you're hearing is pressure waves emitted from the black hole causing ripples in the cluster of stars' hot gas. But in my warped imagination, it sounds like an alien civilization screaming for their lives. I know; I'm a ghoul. It's MORNING EDITION.

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