Artemis: NASA's New Chapter In Space : Short Wave Humans haven't set foot on the moon in 50 years, but NASA hopes to take one step closer with the launch of a new rocket and space capsule on Monday. Today, science correspondent Nell Greenfieldboyce joins Scientist in Residence Regina G. Barber to talk about what NASA hopes to learn from this test flight and why it might be difficult to justify the program's cost.

Planning to tune in for Monday's launch? Email us at shortwave@npr.org.

Artemis: NASA's New Chapter In Space

Artemis: NASA's New Chapter In Space

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NASA's Space Launch System (SLS) rocket and Orion spacecraft, standing atop the mobile launcher at Kennedy Space Center in Florida. Artemis I will test SLS and Orion as an integrated system prior to crewed flights to the Moon. NASA/Kim Shiflett hide caption

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NASA/Kim Shiflett

NASA's Space Launch System (SLS) rocket and Orion spacecraft, standing atop the mobile launcher at Kennedy Space Center in Florida. Artemis I will test SLS and Orion as an integrated system prior to crewed flights to the Moon.

NASA/Kim Shiflett

Humans haven't set foot on the moon in 50 years, but NASA hopes to take one step closer with the launch of a new rocket and space capsule on Monday. Today, science correspondent Nell Greenfieldboyce joins Scientist in Residence Regina G. Barber to talk about what NASA hopes to learn from this test flight and why it might be difficult to justify the program's cost.

Planning to tune in for Monday's launch? Email us at shortwave@npr.org.

This episode was produced by Chloee Weiner, edited by Rebecca Ramirez and fact-checked by Rachel Carlson.