The Future Of Working In Fast Food : 1A California's state senate passed a bill last week that could revolutionize the west coast and U.S. fast-food industry. The bill aims to create a council that would set wages and working conditions for the industry.

According to a study by UCLA and UC-Berkley, nearly two-thirds of fast-food workers in Los Angeles said they'd experienced wage theft. Nearly half experienced injuries or faced health and safety hazards on the job.

This legislation would be the first of its kind in the country.

We discuss the bill and what impacts it could have on the fast-food industry and across the U.S.

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The Future Of Working In Fast Food

The Future Of Working In Fast Food

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A McDonalds' employee holds up a food package at a test location in a restaurant at The GelreDome Arnhem, The Netherlands. REMKO DE WAAL/ANP/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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REMKO DE WAAL/ANP/AFP via Getty Images

A McDonalds' employee holds up a food package at a test location in a restaurant at The GelreDome Arnhem, The Netherlands.

REMKO DE WAAL/ANP/AFP via Getty Images

California passed a bill that could revolutionize the west coast and U.S. fast-food industry. The bill aims to create a council that would set wages and working conditions for the industry.

According to a study by UCLA and UC-Berkley, nearly two-thirds of fast-food workers in Los Angeles said they'd experienced wage theft. Nearly half experienced injuries or faced health and safety hazards on the job.

This legislation would be the first of its kind in the country. If passed, other places in the U.S. and maybe even other nations could follow suit.

We hear from a fast-food worker who's been speaking out about the poor working conditions at his job and what he hopes the bill could change.

Ken Jacobs and Sandro Flores join us for the conversation.

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