The world's largest shipping line reroutes its ships to avoid hitting whales The endangered blue whale is found off the southern tip of Sri Lanka. Shipping vessels go through the whales' habitat and can hit and kill them. The Mediterranean Shipping Co. changed its routes.

The world's largest shipping line reroutes its ships to avoid hitting whales

The world's largest shipping line reroutes its ships to avoid hitting whales

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The endangered blue whale is found off the southern tip of Sri Lanka. Shipping vessels go through the whales' habitat and can hit and kill them. The Mediterranean Shipping Co. changed its routes.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Steve Inskeep.

The endangered blue whale is found off the southern tip of Sri Lanka, and cargo ships steam right through its habitat. They can strike and kill the whales, which is why the decision of one shipping company matters. The Mediterranean Shipping Company, which is the world's largest shipping line, rerouted its ships. Blue whales live 70 to 80 years, and somewhere right now is a whale that will live a bit longer.

It's MORNING EDITION.

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