Warner Bros. Discovery is shutting down HBO Max. What does it mean for viewers? : It's Been a Minute HBO gave us some of the most iconic television shows of our time: Sex and the City. The Sopranos. Game of Thrones. But is the era of HBO coming to a close?

Earlier this year, HBO's parent company, Warner Media, merged with Discovery. By next year, the new Warner Bros. Discovery will combine HBO Max with Discovery Plus into an as-yet unnamed umbrella streaming service. The merger raises questions about what's next for the HBO brand – including whether or not "HBO" will still mean "quality TV" once the dust settles.

Guest host Elise Hu talks to Charles Pulliam-Moore, who covers TV and film for The Verge, about HBO's legacy, how it paved the way for prestige TV, and what changes at the company could mean for what kind of television we'll see.

You can follow us on Twitter @NPRItsBeenAMin and email us at IBAM@npr.org.

How HBO transformed television

How HBO transformed television

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HBO set out to do what networks wouldn't (and couldn't) do. In the process, the company changed TV as we know it. Thiago Prudencio/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images hide caption

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Thiago Prudencio/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images

HBO set out to do what networks wouldn't (and couldn't) do. In the process, the company changed TV as we know it.

Thiago Prudencio/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images

HBO gave us some of the most iconic television shows of our time: Sex and the City, The Sopranos, Game of Thrones. But is the era of HBO coming to a close?

Earlier this year, HBO's parent company, Warner Media, merged with Discovery. By 2023, the new Warner Bros. Discovery will combine HBO Max and Discovery Plus into an as-yet unnamed umbrella streaming service. The merger also raises questions about what's next for the HBO brand – including whether or not "HBO" will still mean "quality TV" once the dust settles.

Guest host Elise Hu talks to Charles Pulliam-Moore, who covers TV and film for The Verge, about HBO's legacy, how it paved the way for prestige TV, and what the changes at the company could mean for the future of prestige television.

This episode was produced by Jessica Mendoza, with engineering support from Hannah Copeland and Josephine Nyounai. It was edited by Kitty Eisele and Jessica Placzek. You can follow us on Twitter @NPRItsBeenAMin and email us at IBAM@npr.org.