What The Queen's Death Means For The Future Of The Commonwealth : 1A The British Commonwealth is a political organization of 56 countries across the globe. It accounts for 2.5 billion people, with India making up more than half of that number.

But its future following the queen's death remains uncertain. Barbados left the organization last year and both Jamaica and Belize are considering departures.

The history of British colonial rule in the Caribbean and the possibility of reparations are hot topics of discussion among regional advocates and leaders.

We discuss the Commonwealth's history, why countries join, and why they leave.

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What The Queen's Death Means For The Future Of The Commonwealth

What The Queen's Death Means For The Future Of The Commonwealth

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Queen Elizabeth II and Prince Philip are met by Indian Prime Minister Indira Gandhi (1917 – 1984) and President Zail Singh (1916 – 1994) at Palam Airport, New Delhi, during a Commonwealth tour of India, 17th November 1983. Fox Photos/Getty Images hide caption

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Fox Photos/Getty Images

Queen Elizabeth II and Prince Philip are met by Indian Prime Minister Indira Gandhi (1917 – 1984) and President Zail Singh (1916 – 1994) at Palam Airport, New Delhi, during a Commonwealth tour of India, 17th November 1983.

Fox Photos/Getty Images

When Queen Elizabeth II died last week, her son Charles became king. Not only in the United Kingdom but in 14 additional countries around the world.

The British Commonwealth is a political organization of 56 countries across the globe. It accounts for 2.5 billion people, with India making up more than half of that number.

But its future following the queen's death remains uncertain. Barbados left the organization last year and both Jamaica and Belize are considering departures.

The history of British colonial rule in the Caribbean and the possibility of reparations are hot topics of discussion among regional advocates and leaders.

We gather a panel to talk about the Commonwealth's history, why countries join, and why they leave.

Foreign Policy's Amy MacKinnon, Belize Minister of Public Service, Constitutional & Political Reform Henry Charles Usher, Tufts University's Aysha Jalal, the Financial Times' Aanu Adeoye, and The Washington Post's Michael Miller join us for the conversation.

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