How a Cambodian practitioner helped a community dealing with PTSD : Invisibilia In San Jose, California, a community clinic was stumped as to why their clients were seeing ghosts. This week, a story about grappling with ghosts of our past and one clinic's attempt to heal intergenerational trauma.

Therapy Ghostbusters

Therapy Ghostbusters

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James Blue for NPR
Invisibilia Season 9, Episode 3
James Blue for NPR

What does it take to address the collective trauma of a genocide? This week, we're shining a light on the ghosts haunting a community of Cambodian immigrants living in San Jose, California. When author and reporter Stephanie Foo was researching for her memoir, What My Bones Know: A Memoir of Healing from Complex Trauma, she went back home after fifteen years to find a community still struggling to break pervasive cycles of trauma and abuse. In the process, she found a route towards understanding how to heal wounds spanning generations.

If you or someone you know may be considering suicide, call or text 988 to reach the suicide and crisis lifeline.

If you are experiencing abuse and need help, you can call the National Domestic Violence Hotline at 1-800-799-7233, or visit its page for an online chat.

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