The Swiss are now smack DAB in the middle of U.S.-Afghanistan relations : The Indicator from Planet Money What happens when a country's foreign reserves are stored in another country, and then part of that is run by a third? No, it's not the start of a bad joke. It's the story of Afghanistan, the U.S., and Switzerland.

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The financial web connecting Afghanistan, the US, and Switzerland

The financial web connecting Afghanistan, the US, and Switzerland

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Afghan money changers count banknotes at the currency exchange Sarayee Shahzada market in Kabul in 2015. Wakil Kohsar/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Wakil Kohsar/AFP via Getty Images

Afghan money changers count banknotes at the currency exchange Sarayee Shahzada market in Kabul in 2015.

Wakil Kohsar/AFP via Getty Images

What happens when a country's foreign reserves are stored in another country, and then part of that is run by a third? No, it's not the start of a bad joke. It's the story of Afghanistan, the U.S., and Switzerland.

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For sponsor-free episodes of The Indicator from Planet Money, subscribe to Planet Money+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org.