Where Migrants Are Headed : Consider This from NPR The past twelve months have been the deadliest on record for the migrants crossing the Southern U.S. Border from Mexico. More than 800 have died in the last fiscal year.

This past year also saw a shift in migration. More and more are coming from Nicaragua, Cuba and Venezuela. Past entry points have given way to more remote locations on the border, like Eagle Pass and Del Rio, Texas.

These were sleepy border towns, now they are some of the busiest junctions on the border.

Who is arriving and what happens when they get there?NPR's Marisa Peñaloza and Joel Rose report.

In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what's going on in your community.

Email us at considerthis@npr.org.

Migration Is Shifting. Who Is Crossing Where?

Migration Is Shifting. Who Is Crossing Where?

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In the 2022 fiscal year US Customs and Border Patrol (CBP) has had over 2 million encounters with migrants at the US-Mexico border, setting a new record in CBP history. Allison Dinner/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Allison Dinner/AFP via Getty Images

In the 2022 fiscal year US Customs and Border Patrol (CBP) has had over 2 million encounters with migrants at the US-Mexico border, setting a new record in CBP history.

Allison Dinner/AFP via Getty Images

The past twelve months have been the deadliest on record for the migrants crossing the Southern U.S. Border from Mexico. More than 800 have died in the last fiscal year.

This past year also saw a shift in migration. More and more are coming from Nicaragua, Cuba and Venezuela. Past entry points have given way to more remote locations on the border, like Eagle Pass and Del Rio, Texas.

These were sleepy border towns, now they are some of the busiest junctions on the border.

Who is arriving and what happens when they get there?NPR's Marisa Peñaloza and Joel Rose report.

In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what's going on in your community.

Email us at considerthis@npr.org.