A Scandal In Chess Reveals Why We Care About Cheating : Consider This from NPR Cheating allegations have rocked many worlds over the last few weeks.

Chess, fishing, poker, and even Irish dancing.

These 'sports' cheating scandals have attracted a lot of attention lately.

Maurice Schweitzer is a professor at the Wharton School of Business at the University of Pennsylvania.

He studies emotions, trust and ethical decision making and says that our reaction to cheating might tell us something deeper about human nature and why we care about people cheating to get ahead.

In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what's going on in your community.

Email us at considerthis@npr.org.

Chess, Fishing, Irish Dancing: Cheating Scandals Reveal Why We Care About Cheating

Chess, Fishing, Irish Dancing: Cheating Scandals Reveal Why We Care About Cheating

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US international grandmaster Hans Niemann waits his turn to move during a second-round chess game against Jeffery Xiong on the second day of the Saint Louis Chess Club Fall Chess Classic in St. Louis, Missouri, on October 6, 2022. Tim Vizer/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Tim Vizer/AFP via Getty Images

US international grandmaster Hans Niemann waits his turn to move during a second-round chess game against Jeffery Xiong on the second day of the Saint Louis Chess Club Fall Chess Classic in St. Louis, Missouri, on October 6, 2022.

Tim Vizer/AFP via Getty Images

Cheating allegations have rocked many worlds over the last few weeks.

Chess, fishing, poker, and even Irish dancing.

These 'sports' cheating scandals have attracted a lot of attention lately.

The reaction from the public makes it clear that society looks down on cheaters.

Maurice Schweitzer is a professor at the Wharton School of Business at the University of Pennsylvania.

He studies emotions, trust and ethical decision making and says that our reaction to cheating might tell us something deeper about human nature and why we care about people cheating to get ahead.

In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what's going on in your community.

Email us at considerthis@npr.org.

This episode was produced by Brianna Scott. It was edited by Bridget Kelley. Our executive producer is Sami Yenigun.