Black reality in a world of fantasy : Code Switch Why build a fantasy world that still has racism? B.A. Parker moderates a discussion on Black science fiction and fantasy with authors Tochi Onyebuchi and Leslye Penelope at the National Book Festival.

Black reality in a world of fantasy

Black reality in a world of fantasy

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Authors Tochi Onyebuchi (left) and Leslye Penelope (right) share their experiences building fantasy worlds in their latest sci-fi novels Goliath and The Monsters We Defy. PR Agency hide caption

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Authors Tochi Onyebuchi (left) and Leslye Penelope (right) share their experiences building fantasy worlds in their latest sci-fi novels Goliath and The Monsters We Defy.

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Code Switch's B.A. Parker moderates a panel at the National Book Festival with two Black science fiction and fantasy writers.

Tochi Onyebuchi's sci-fi novel Goliath imagines a futuristic New Haven where all of the white and wealthy people have left our climate destroyed planet. Those who are left behind are the poor and people of color. Leslye Penelope's latest novel, The Monsters We Defy, takes place in a fantastical version of 1920s Washington, DC, where a young black woman who talks to spirits goes on a jewelry heist.

In her discussion with Onyebuchi and Penelope, Parker explores why the authors built fantasy worlds that still had racism, classism and other ills of reality.