The Price of Poverty: How Inflation Hurts America's Low Paid Workers : 1A Rising food and energy costs are hurting Americans' pockets, especially for those earning lower wages.

Wages haven't kept up with inflation. But low-income workers have seen some of the largest percent increases in pay since the pandemic.

But how long will those reported gains last? How do we fix a system that asks millions to work hard, but doesn't earn them enough to live on?

We partnered with WFPL in Louisville, Kentucky and talk to small business owners, consumers and workers impacted by inflation.

This conversation is part of our Remaking America collaboration with six public radio stations around the country. Remaking America is funded in part by the Corporation for Public Broadcasting.

Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find us on Twitter @1A.

1A

The Price of Poverty: How Inflation Hurts America's Low Paid Workers

The Price of Poverty: How Inflation Hurts America's Low Paid Workers

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1130391737/1130397738" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

(Photo credit Apu Gomes/ Getty Images) APU GOMES/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
APU GOMES/AFP via Getty Images

(Photo credit Apu Gomes/ Getty Images)

APU GOMES/AFP via Getty Images

Rising food and energy costs are hurting Americans' pockets, especially for the those earning the least.

But as the Federal Reserve tries to curb inflation by raising interest rates and slowing down the economy, how will that impact some of the country's lowest paid workers?

Wages haven't exactly kept up with inflation. But low-income workers have seen some of the largest percent increases in pay since the pandemic. These workers have also gained more bargaining power, individually and collectively, because businesses are struggling to fill jobs.

But will the reported gains made by those on low incomes last? How do we fix a system that asks millions to work hard, but doesn't pay them enough to live?

This conversation is part of our Remaking America collaboration with six public radio stations around the country. Remaking America is funded in part by the Corporation for Public Broadcasting.

Jeanna Smialek, Tim Smeeding, and Addi Atkins join us for the conversation.

Like what you hear? Find more of our programs online.