New research links harder-to-pronounce names with hiring discrimination : The Indicator from Planet Money What's in a name? New research shows that for some people, employment prospects could be on the line. We hear from two economists who looked at hundreds of econ Ph.D. students to find out if the ones with harder-to-pronounce names were hurt in the job market.

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What's in a name? Maybe a job

What's in a name? Maybe a job

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A person fills in a name tag.
Getty Images/Tetra Images RF

If you've got a hard to pronounce name, a coffee run to Starbucks can be really annoying — but new research shows that in the job market, the consequences can be far greater. A recent study of econ Ph.D. students found that job candidates with names that are harder to pronounce fared worse than their similarly qualified peers.

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