Qatar's Human Rights Record Is Troubling To Many Ahead Of Soccer World Cup : Consider This from NPR Billions will be watching when the men's soccer World Cup begins in Qatar this month. But the country's human rights record will also be in the global spotlight during the tournament.

A 2021 investigation by The Guardian revealed that more than 6,500 migrant laborers died during the construction of World Cup facilities and infrastructure.

There are also questions about how LGBTQ soccer fans and players may be treated in Qatar, where homosexuality is illegal.

We hear from one man who is speaking out about the lack of LGBTQ rights in his home country. And we speak with Minky Worden of Human Rights Watch, one of the groups that has been putting pressure on Qatar ahead of the World Cup.

In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what's going on in your community.

Email us at considerthis@npr.org.

Qatar's Human Rights Record In The Spotlight Ahead Of 2022 World Cup

Qatar's Human Rights Record In The Spotlight Ahead Of 2022 World Cup

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Its been reported that more than 6,500 migrant laborers died in the course of the construction work for the World Cup over the last twelve years. Sean Gallup/Getty Images hide caption

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Sean Gallup/Getty Images

Its been reported that more than 6,500 migrant laborers died in the course of the construction work for the World Cup over the last twelve years.

Sean Gallup/Getty Images

Billions will be watching when the men's soccer World Cup begins in Qatar this month. But the country's human rights record will also be in the global spotlight during the tournament.

A 2021 investigation by The Guardian revealed that more than 6,500 migrant laborers died during the construction of World Cup facilities and infrastructure.

There are also questions about how LGBTQ soccer fans and players may be treated in Qatar, where homosexuality is illegal.

We hear from one man who is speaking out about the lack of LGBTQ rights in his home country. And we speak with Minky Worden of Human Rights Watch, one of the groups that has been putting pressure on Qatar ahead of the World Cup.

In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what's going on in your community.

Email us at considerthis@npr.org.

This episode was produced by Brianna Scott. It was edited by William Troop. Our executive producer is Sami Yenigun.