The Future Of Affirmative Action : 1A Affirmative action is once again on the Supreme Court docket.

Two separate cases have been filed that argue against Affirmative Action and court watchers believe the policy could be doomed under the current conservative supermajority.

We discuss the history of Affirmative Action, its legal background, and the potential impact a Supreme Court ruling could have on hiring practices.

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The Future Of Affirmative Action

The Future Of Affirmative Action

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Students throw their caps in the air ahead of their graduation ceremony. Dan Kitwood/Getty Images hide caption

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Dan Kitwood/Getty Images

Students throw their caps in the air ahead of their graduation ceremony.

Dan Kitwood/Getty Images

On Monday, the Supreme Court justices engaged in a 5-hour debate over the future of Affirmative Action. The discussion stemmed from two separate lawsuits filed by a nonprofit called Students for Fair Admissions against the University of North Carolina and Harvard University.

The cases argue that the schools' Affirmative Action admission protocols are discriminatory against Asian-Americans.

AffirmativeAaction has been protected under Supreme Court precedent for twenty years, but watchers of the high court believe the policy could be doomed under the current conservative supermajority.

Affirmative Action lacks broad public support in the US. A Pew Research poll released in 2022 found that 74 percent of Americans think race and ethnicity should not be considered in admissions decisions.

We talk to our panel about the history of Affirmative Action, its legal background, and the potential impact a Supreme Court ruling could have on hiring practices based on race.

Columbia University's Olatunde Johnson, University of North Carolina's Ted Shaw, and former admissions counselor at Dartmouth University Ayesha Whyte join us for the conversation.

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