Here's How Inflation Became The Biggest Story Of The Midterms : The NPR Politics Podcast Trump and Biden signed off on historic amounts of stimulus money that helped the country's economy weather the pandemic, but — on top of supply chain straggles and shutdowns — that money may have come with a downside: increasing inflation. Now, as voters considered their midterm voter, rising costs are top of mind.

This episode: political correspondent Susan Davis and White House correspondent Asma Khalid.

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Here's How Inflation Became The Biggest Story Of The Midterms

Here's How Inflation Became The Biggest Story Of The Midterms

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Sen. Rick Scott (R-FL) speaks before a Senate Republican Policy luncheon at the Russell Senate Office Building on May 18, 2021 in Washington, DC. Kevin Dietsch/Getty Images hide caption

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Kevin Dietsch/Getty Images

Sen. Rick Scott (R-FL) speaks before a Senate Republican Policy luncheon at the Russell Senate Office Building on May 18, 2021 in Washington, DC.

Kevin Dietsch/Getty Images

Trump and Biden signed off on historic amounts of stimulus money that helped the country's economy weather the pandemic, but — on top of supply chain straggles and shutdowns — that money may have come with a downside: increasing inflation. Now, as voters considered their midterm voter, rising costs are top of mind.

Support the show and unlock sponsor-free listening with a subscription to The NPR Politics Podcast Plus. Learn more at plus.npr.org/politics

Connect:
Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.org
Join the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.
Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.